Care Coordination and Prescription Drugs - The Future of Healthcare Delivery

Lack of Care Coordination Leads to Excess Prescriptions, Suboptimal Care and High Expenses

Henry is a 69-year-old living alone in a small town about 60 miles from the nearest metropolitan area. He has healthcare coverage via Medicare, Medigap, and Medicare Part D. He had recently been discharged from the hospital after an ICU stay for a urinary tract infection and called to ask for some advice. He was taking twenty-three -- yes, 23 -- different prescription drugs; some once, some twice and some three times per day along with one by shot monthly. He was not certain why many of them had been prescribed and stated that despite them he did not feel well. Here is a partial list: two for heart failure (he did not know that he had heart failure!,) two for diabetes, three for high blood pressure, one to lower his cholesterol, a monthly shot of testosterone for impotence, one to shrink his prostate and one for depression.

I asked him who his primary care physician was and learned that he did not have one but rather went to four different doctors, each of whom treated different issues and none of whom shared all of his information and none of whom used electronic medial records. Whenever one of them checked his blood pressure, it would be elevated, so that doctor would either add a drug or increase the dosage. He told me that when he went to the local drug store and checked his blood pressure, it was always normal.

Henry’s story represents much of what is not working in the delivery of medical care today. He has four complex, chronic illnesses – heart failure, diabetes, hypertension and depression. These all require careful attention and care coordination, preferably by a single primary care physician who knows the patient’s home and social setting as well as his direct medical issues. The blood pressure medication story is representative. He was getting many too many drugs that he did not need and had become impotent as a result. Rather than looking for the cause, one of the doctors had given another drug [testosterone] that probably had no value but was likely enlarging his prostate. As a result he had developed an infection that had almost killed him. And all these drugs were expensive, both to him and to his Medicare Part D insurance plan.

Heart failure and diabetes together consume more than 50% of our healthcare dollars and here is a person whose care is not being adequately monitored; rather he is getting one drug after another without attention to what else is going on. This lack of care coordination is a prime reason why the costs are so high yet quality so low.

My first suggestion was that Henry needed a primary care physician, one to call his own. He found one who had just started his practice, had the time and inclination to coordinate his care and had installed an electronic medical record system. A few months later Henry called and told me that he was now taking just seven medicines and felt much better!

Henry still has four serious chronic conditions. But with a single physician serving as orchestrator rather than just intervener, one who uses an electronic medical record and who actually pays attention to Henry’s medical plus social and home life, Henry has better quality medical care, he has a much higher quality of life, he is spending less of his money and much less of Medicare, Medigap and Medicare Part D’s money. In short good care coordination is a win-win for all concerned. 

And yet, care coordination is not appreciated for its importance by most physicians, insurers nor patients.

 

Stephen C Schimpff, MD is an internist, professor of medicine and public policy, former CEO of the University of Maryland Medical Center and consults for the US Army, medical startups and Fortune 500 companies. He is the author of The Future of Medicine – Megatrends in Healthcare. Updates are available at http://medicalmegatrends.blogspot.com. His new book, “The Future of Health-Care Delivery: Why It Must Change and How It Will Affect You,” from which this post is adapted, will be published in winter 2011-12 by Potomac Books


 

Last Modified: December 13, 2011


Copyright (c) Stephen C. Schimpff, MD